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Bispebjerg Hospital - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Contact dermatitis caused by glucose sensors, insulin pumps, and tapes: Results from a 5-year period

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. The transcriptome of hand eczema assessed by tape stripping

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  2. Incidence rates of occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark between 2007 and 2018 - A population-based study

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  3. Value of photo assessment in late patch test readings-A multicenter study from six European patch test clinics

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  4. Degree of employment, sick leave, and costs following notification of occupational contact dermatitis-A register-based study

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  1. The transcriptome of hand eczema assessed by tape stripping

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Family burden of hospital-managed pediatric atopic dermatitis: A nationwide registry-based study

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  3. Increased all-cause mortality in concomitant atopic dermatitis and asthma: A nationwide registry-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Chemicals in moisturizers may promote type 2 inflammation and food allergy

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  • Ulrik Ahrensbøll-Friis
  • Anne Birgitte Simonsen
  • Claus Zachariae
  • Jacob P Thyssen
  • Jeanne D Johansen
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BACKGROUND: The number of patients with contact dermatitis from glucose sensors and insulin infusion sets is increasing. Patch testing is challenging because of a lack of information concerning the constituent materials of medical devices.

OBJECTIVES: To report on products and causes of allergic reactions to glucose sensors or insulin infusion sets over a 5-year period and suggest a short screening series.

METHODS: Analysis of patch test data from consecutive patients suspected of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to glucose sensors and/or insulin infusion sets from 2015-2019.

RESULTS: Patient numbers increased from 4 to 15 per year; 30/38 (78.9%) were children. In 29 (76.3%), a diagnosis of allergic/probable ACD was established, mostly due to the tapes of the device or allergens in these tapes (n = 23) followed by allergens in the device housing (n = 10). Isobornyl acrylate, abitol, and colophonium were the most common allergens. Information from manufacturers was often difficult to obtain and, if accessible, inadequate. For this reason, the diagnosis was delayed for more than 1.5 years in 12 (31%) patients.

CONCLUSIONS: The increasing number of patients, mostly children, with ACD from devices used in treatment of type 1 diabetes demonstrates the importance of this problem. Allergies can easily be overlooked, due to the lack of mandatory labeling of the constituent materials of the devices.

Original languageEnglish
JournalContact Dermatitis
Volume84
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)75-81
Number of pages7
ISSN0105-1873
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

    Research areas

  • abitol, colophonium, contact allergy, glucose sensors, insulin pumps, isobornyl acrylate

ID: 62443218