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Birth weight and the risk of histological subtypes of ovarian and endometrial cancers: Results from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register

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@article{9986b4aa83354ff1adb2f1bc86e7574e,
title = "Birth weight and the risk of histological subtypes of ovarian and endometrial cancers: Results from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Studies of birth weight associations with ovarian and endometrial cancer risks are limited with inconsistent results, and none has evaluated associations by histologic subtype. We utilized prospectively collected birth weight information to investigate the association with risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers overall and by histologic subtype.METHODS: 162,559 girls, born from 1930 to 1989, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR) were followed prospectively via linkage with the Danish health registers. Ovarian (n=666) and endometrial (n=694) cancers were identified from 1978 to 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).RESULTS: Women with lower (2.0-3.25 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) and higher (3.75-5.5 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) birth weights had increased risks of ovarian cancer overall [HR (95% CI): 1.27 (1.06-1.52); 1.51 (1.21-1.87), respectively] and serous ovarian cancers [1.54 (1.19-1.98); 1.98 (1.47-2.67), respectively]. A decreased risk of Type II endometrial tumors was suggested per kilogram increase in birth weight [HR (95% CI): 0.63 (0.40-1.00)].CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that both lower and higher birth weights were associated with increased ovarian cancer risk and associations were particularly strong for serous ovarian cancer, the most common subtype. Birth weight was not associated with most types of endometrial cancer.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Britton Trabert and Julie Aarestrup and Ulrich, {Lian G} and Nicolas Wentzensen and S{\o}rensen, {Thorkild I A} and Baker, {Jennifer L}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.",
year = "2018",
month = jan,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.12.031",
language = "English",
volume = "148",
pages = "547--552",
journal = "Gynecologic Oncology",
issn = "0090-8258",
publisher = "Academic Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Birth weight and the risk of histological subtypes of ovarian and endometrial cancers

T2 - Results from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register

AU - Trabert, Britton

AU - Aarestrup, Julie

AU - Ulrich, Lian G

AU - Wentzensen, Nicolas

AU - Sørensen, Thorkild I A

AU - Baker, Jennifer L

N1 - Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PY - 2018/1/10

Y1 - 2018/1/10

N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies of birth weight associations with ovarian and endometrial cancer risks are limited with inconsistent results, and none has evaluated associations by histologic subtype. We utilized prospectively collected birth weight information to investigate the association with risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers overall and by histologic subtype.METHODS: 162,559 girls, born from 1930 to 1989, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR) were followed prospectively via linkage with the Danish health registers. Ovarian (n=666) and endometrial (n=694) cancers were identified from 1978 to 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).RESULTS: Women with lower (2.0-3.25 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) and higher (3.75-5.5 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) birth weights had increased risks of ovarian cancer overall [HR (95% CI): 1.27 (1.06-1.52); 1.51 (1.21-1.87), respectively] and serous ovarian cancers [1.54 (1.19-1.98); 1.98 (1.47-2.67), respectively]. A decreased risk of Type II endometrial tumors was suggested per kilogram increase in birth weight [HR (95% CI): 0.63 (0.40-1.00)].CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that both lower and higher birth weights were associated with increased ovarian cancer risk and associations were particularly strong for serous ovarian cancer, the most common subtype. Birth weight was not associated with most types of endometrial cancer.

AB - BACKGROUND: Studies of birth weight associations with ovarian and endometrial cancer risks are limited with inconsistent results, and none has evaluated associations by histologic subtype. We utilized prospectively collected birth weight information to investigate the association with risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers overall and by histologic subtype.METHODS: 162,559 girls, born from 1930 to 1989, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR) were followed prospectively via linkage with the Danish health registers. Ovarian (n=666) and endometrial (n=694) cancers were identified from 1978 to 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).RESULTS: Women with lower (2.0-3.25 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) and higher (3.75-5.5 vs. 3.26-3.75kg) birth weights had increased risks of ovarian cancer overall [HR (95% CI): 1.27 (1.06-1.52); 1.51 (1.21-1.87), respectively] and serous ovarian cancers [1.54 (1.19-1.98); 1.98 (1.47-2.67), respectively]. A decreased risk of Type II endometrial tumors was suggested per kilogram increase in birth weight [HR (95% CI): 0.63 (0.40-1.00)].CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that both lower and higher birth weights were associated with increased ovarian cancer risk and associations were particularly strong for serous ovarian cancer, the most common subtype. Birth weight was not associated with most types of endometrial cancer.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.12.031

DO - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.12.031

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29331371

VL - 148

SP - 547

EP - 552

JO - Gynecologic Oncology

JF - Gynecologic Oncology

SN - 0090-8258

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 52664913