Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Three-Year Intervention Effects on Food and Beverage Intake-Results from the Quasi-Experimental Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{3df8f97f149f4f18845edb3beebf00a2,
title = "Three-Year Intervention Effects on Food and Beverage Intake-Results from the Quasi-Experimental Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)",
abstract = "The diet of Danish children is often not in accordance with dietary guidelines. We aimed to evaluate changes in the intake of selected foods and beverages during a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention, and to investigate if changes were modified by socioeconomic status (SES). The study included 307 children (intervention group: 184; comparison group: 123) with information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention as well as on SES. Linear regression models were conducted to assess the effect of the intervention on changes in dietary factors. Children from the intervention group increased their intake of whole-grain bread during the intervention (group means: 6.1 g/d (95% CI: 2.2 to 10.0) vs. 0.3 g/d (95% CI: -3.1 to 3.7) in the comparison group, p = 0.04). A significant interaction between SES and group allocation was observed to change in fruit intake (p = 0.01). Among children from low SES families, only those from the comparison group decreased their fruit intake (group means: -40.0 g/d (95% CI: -56.0 to -23.9) vs. 9.3 g/d (95% CI: -16.1 to 94) in the intervention group, p = 0.006). The present study found no convincing effect of introducing a multi-component intervention on dietary intake except a small beneficial effect on whole-grain bread consumption. However, beneficial intervention effects in fruit intake were found particularly among children from low SES families.",
author = "Xuan Ren and Jensen, {Britt Wang} and Larsen, {Sofus Christian} and Rohde, {Jeanett Friis} and Specht, {Ina Olmer} and Nielsen, {Birgit Marie} and Ida Husby and Anna Bugge and Andersen, {Lars Bo} and Ellen Trolle and Heitmann, {Berit Lilienthal}",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
day = "8",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph181910543",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "10543",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1661-7827",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "19",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Three-Year Intervention Effects on Food and Beverage Intake-Results from the Quasi-Experimental Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

AU - Ren, Xuan

AU - Jensen, Britt Wang

AU - Larsen, Sofus Christian

AU - Rohde, Jeanett Friis

AU - Specht, Ina Olmer

AU - Nielsen, Birgit Marie

AU - Husby, Ida

AU - Bugge, Anna

AU - Andersen, Lars Bo

AU - Trolle, Ellen

AU - Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

PY - 2021/10/8

Y1 - 2021/10/8

N2 - The diet of Danish children is often not in accordance with dietary guidelines. We aimed to evaluate changes in the intake of selected foods and beverages during a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention, and to investigate if changes were modified by socioeconomic status (SES). The study included 307 children (intervention group: 184; comparison group: 123) with information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention as well as on SES. Linear regression models were conducted to assess the effect of the intervention on changes in dietary factors. Children from the intervention group increased their intake of whole-grain bread during the intervention (group means: 6.1 g/d (95% CI: 2.2 to 10.0) vs. 0.3 g/d (95% CI: -3.1 to 3.7) in the comparison group, p = 0.04). A significant interaction between SES and group allocation was observed to change in fruit intake (p = 0.01). Among children from low SES families, only those from the comparison group decreased their fruit intake (group means: -40.0 g/d (95% CI: -56.0 to -23.9) vs. 9.3 g/d (95% CI: -16.1 to 94) in the intervention group, p = 0.006). The present study found no convincing effect of introducing a multi-component intervention on dietary intake except a small beneficial effect on whole-grain bread consumption. However, beneficial intervention effects in fruit intake were found particularly among children from low SES families.

AB - The diet of Danish children is often not in accordance with dietary guidelines. We aimed to evaluate changes in the intake of selected foods and beverages during a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention, and to investigate if changes were modified by socioeconomic status (SES). The study included 307 children (intervention group: 184; comparison group: 123) with information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention as well as on SES. Linear regression models were conducted to assess the effect of the intervention on changes in dietary factors. Children from the intervention group increased their intake of whole-grain bread during the intervention (group means: 6.1 g/d (95% CI: 2.2 to 10.0) vs. 0.3 g/d (95% CI: -3.1 to 3.7) in the comparison group, p = 0.04). A significant interaction between SES and group allocation was observed to change in fruit intake (p = 0.01). Among children from low SES families, only those from the comparison group decreased their fruit intake (group means: -40.0 g/d (95% CI: -56.0 to -23.9) vs. 9.3 g/d (95% CI: -16.1 to 94) in the intervention group, p = 0.006). The present study found no convincing effect of introducing a multi-component intervention on dietary intake except a small beneficial effect on whole-grain bread consumption. However, beneficial intervention effects in fruit intake were found particularly among children from low SES families.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85116590814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph181910543

DO - 10.3390/ijerph181910543

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34639843

VL - 18

SP - 10543

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1661-7827

IS - 19

M1 - 10543

ER -

ID: 68408526