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Social inequality in tooth loss: separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits

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Harvard

Hach, M, Christensen, LB, Lange, T, Hvidtfeldt, UA, Danielsen, B, Diderichsen, F, Osler, M, Prescott, E & Andersen, I 2021, 'Social inequality in tooth loss: separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits', Community dental health, bind 38, nr. 4, s. 241-245. https://doi.org/10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05

APA

Hach, M., Christensen, L. B., Lange, T., Hvidtfeldt, U. A., Danielsen, B., Diderichsen, F., Osler, M., Prescott, E., & Andersen, I. (2021). Social inequality in tooth loss: separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits. Community dental health, 38(4), 241-245. https://doi.org/10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05

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MLA

Vancouver

Hach M, Christensen LB, Lange T, Hvidtfeldt UA, Danielsen B, Diderichsen F o.a. Social inequality in tooth loss: separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits. Community dental health. 2021 nov 29;38(4):241-245. https://doi.org/10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05

Author

Hach, M ; Christensen, L B ; Lange, T ; Hvidtfeldt, U A ; Danielsen, B ; Diderichsen, F ; Osler, M ; Prescott, E ; Andersen, I. / Social inequality in tooth loss : separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits. I: Community dental health. 2021 ; Bind 38, Nr. 4. s. 241-245.

Bibtex

@article{4393a052ff6a4821b30d3df4a6122d8a,
title = "Social inequality in tooth loss: separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits on tooth loss.BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Participants from the Social Inequality in Cancer Cohort (SIC) were followed in registers for household income (2000), dental visits (2002-2009) and tooth loss (2010-2016). Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of household income and dental visits on tooth loss, and linear models were applied to assess the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits.RESULTS: In total, 10.8% of the participants had tooth loss (⟨15 teeth present). Low household income and irregular dental visits showed significantly higher odds ratios for tooth loss. Compared to regular dental visits, irregular dental visits accounted for 923 (95% CI 840 - 1,005) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons, and compared to high household income, low household income accounted for 1,294 (95% CI 1,124 - 1,464) additional cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons. Further, due to household income-dental visit interaction, we observed 581 (95% CI 233 - 928) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons.CONCLUSION: Low household income and irregular dental visits are important in relation to social inequality in tooth loss. Irregular dental visits are associated with higher risk of tooth loss among persons with low household income compared to persons with high household income. Such interaction may be explained by differences in susceptibility to tooth loss across household income groups.",
keywords = "Cohort Studies, Humans, Income, Socioeconomic Factors, Tooth Loss/epidemiology",
author = "M Hach and Christensen, {L B} and T Lange and Hvidtfeldt, {U A} and B Danielsen and F Diderichsen and M Osler and E Prescott and I Andersen",
note = "Copyright{\textcopyright} 2021 Dennis Barber Ltd.",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "29",
doi = "10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "241--245",
journal = "Community dental health",
issn = "0265-539X",
publisher = "FDI World Dental Press Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social inequality in tooth loss

T2 - separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits

AU - Hach, M

AU - Christensen, L B

AU - Lange, T

AU - Hvidtfeldt, U A

AU - Danielsen, B

AU - Diderichsen, F

AU - Osler, M

AU - Prescott, E

AU - Andersen, I

N1 - Copyright© 2021 Dennis Barber Ltd.

PY - 2021/11/29

Y1 - 2021/11/29

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits on tooth loss.BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Participants from the Social Inequality in Cancer Cohort (SIC) were followed in registers for household income (2000), dental visits (2002-2009) and tooth loss (2010-2016). Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of household income and dental visits on tooth loss, and linear models were applied to assess the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits.RESULTS: In total, 10.8% of the participants had tooth loss (⟨15 teeth present). Low household income and irregular dental visits showed significantly higher odds ratios for tooth loss. Compared to regular dental visits, irregular dental visits accounted for 923 (95% CI 840 - 1,005) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons, and compared to high household income, low household income accounted for 1,294 (95% CI 1,124 - 1,464) additional cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons. Further, due to household income-dental visit interaction, we observed 581 (95% CI 233 - 928) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons.CONCLUSION: Low household income and irregular dental visits are important in relation to social inequality in tooth loss. Irregular dental visits are associated with higher risk of tooth loss among persons with low household income compared to persons with high household income. Such interaction may be explained by differences in susceptibility to tooth loss across household income groups.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits on tooth loss.BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Participants from the Social Inequality in Cancer Cohort (SIC) were followed in registers for household income (2000), dental visits (2002-2009) and tooth loss (2010-2016). Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of household income and dental visits on tooth loss, and linear models were applied to assess the separate and joint effects of household income and dental visits.RESULTS: In total, 10.8% of the participants had tooth loss (⟨15 teeth present). Low household income and irregular dental visits showed significantly higher odds ratios for tooth loss. Compared to regular dental visits, irregular dental visits accounted for 923 (95% CI 840 - 1,005) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons, and compared to high household income, low household income accounted for 1,294 (95% CI 1,124 - 1,464) additional cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons. Further, due to household income-dental visit interaction, we observed 581 (95% CI 233 - 928) extra cases of tooth loss per 10,000 persons.CONCLUSION: Low household income and irregular dental visits are important in relation to social inequality in tooth loss. Irregular dental visits are associated with higher risk of tooth loss among persons with low household income compared to persons with high household income. Such interaction may be explained by differences in susceptibility to tooth loss across household income groups.

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Income

KW - Socioeconomic Factors

KW - Tooth Loss/epidemiology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85120423050&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05

DO - 10.1922/CDH_00005Hach05

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34185443

VL - 38

SP - 241

EP - 245

JO - Community dental health

JF - Community dental health

SN - 0265-539X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 66570077