Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Localization, distribution, and connectivity of neuropeptide Y in the human and porcine retinas - a comparative study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells: Subtypes, distribution and intraretinal connectivity

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Central projections of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the macaque monkey

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Mice Lacking EGR1 Have Impaired Clock Gene (BMAL1) Oscillation, Locomotor Activity, and Body Temperature

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Døgnrytmer, søvn og søvnforstyrrelser

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiUndervisningpeer review

  3. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells are resistant to cell injury, but not always

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Laser-induced thermal coagulation enhances skin uptake of topically applied compounds

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Anders Tolstrup Christiansen
  • Jens Folke Kiilgaard
  • Kristian Klemp
  • David Paul Drucker Woldbye
  • Jens Hannibal
Vis graf over relationer

Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a peptide neurotransmitter abundantly expressed in the mammalian retina. Since its discovery, NPY has been studied in retinas of several species, but detailed characterization of morphology, cell-type, and connectivity has never been conducted in larger mammals including humans and pigs. As the pig due to size and cellular composition is a well-suited animal for retinal research, we chose to compare the endogenous NPY system of the human retina to that of pigs to support future research in this field. In the present study, using immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy and 3D reconstructions, we found NPY to be expressed in GABAergic and calretinin-immunoreactive (-ir) amacrine cells of both species as well as parvalbumin-ir amacrine cells of humans. Furthermore, we identified at least two different types of medium- to wide-field NPY-ir amacrine cells. Finally, we detected likely synaptic appositions between the NPY-ir amacrine cells and melanopsin- and non-melanopsin-ir ganglion cells, GABAergic and dopaminergic amacrine cells, rod bipolar cells, and horizontal cells, suggesting that NPY-ir cells play diverse roles in modulation of both image and non-image forming retinal signaling. These findings extend existing knowledge on NPY and NPY-expressing cells in the human and porcine retina showing a high degree of comparability. The extensive distribution and connectivity of NPY-ir cells described in the present study further highlights the potential importance of NPY signaling in retinal function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of comparative neurology
Vol/bind526
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1877-1895
Antal sider18
ISSN0021-9967
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

ID: 53721259