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Bispebjerg Hospital - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Live video from bystanders' smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Vis graf over relationer

AIM: To investigate whether live video streaming from the bystander's smartphone to a medical dispatcher can improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

METHODS: After CPR was initiated, live video was added to the communication by the medical dispatcher using smartphone technology. From the video recordings, we subjectively evaluated changes in CPR quality after themedical dispatcher had used live video to dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR). CPR quality was registered for each bystander and compared with CPR quality after video-instructed DA-CPR. Data were analysed using logistic regression adjusted for bystander's relation to the patient and whether the arrest was witnessed.

RESULTS: CPR was provided with live video streaming in 52 OHCA calls, with 90 bystanders who performed chest compressions. Hand position was incorrect for 38 bystanders (42.2%) and improved for 23 bystanders (60.5%) after video-instructed DA-CPR. The compression rate was incorrect for 36 bystanders (40.0%) and improved for 27 bystanders (75.0%). Compression depth was incorrect for 57 bystanders (63.3%) and improved for 33 bystanders (57.9%). The adjusted odds ratios for improved CPR after video-instructed DA-CPR were; hand position 5.8 (95% CI: 2.8-12.1), compression rate 7.7 (95% CI: 3.4-17.3), and compression depth 7.1 (95% CI: 3.9-12.9). Hands-off time was reduced for 34 (37.8%) bystanders.

CONCLUSIONS: Live video streaming from the scene of a cardiac arrest to medical dispatchers is feasible. It allowed an opportunity for dispatchers to coach those providing CPR which was associated with a subjectively evaluated improvement in CPR performance.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftResuscitation
Vol/bind168
Sider (fra-til)35-43
Antal sider9
ISSN0300-9572
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 9 sep. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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