Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Bispebjerg Hospital - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital

Does Glucagon-like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist stimulation reduce alcohol intake in patients with alcohol dependence?

Projekt: Typer af projekterProjekt

  1. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in depression

    Projekt: Typer af projekterProjekt

  2. Klinisk Farmakologisk Laboratorium Projekter Q-7642

    Projekt: Typer af projekterProjekt

  • Fink-Jensen, Anders (Projektleder, faglig)
  • Klausen, Mette Kruse (Projektdeltager)
  • Jensen, Mathias Ebbesen (Projektdeltager)
  • Fisher, Patrick M. (Projektdeltager)
  • Macoveanu, Julian (Projektdeltager)
  • Thomsen, Gerda Krogh (Projektdeltager)
  • Benveniste, Helene (Projektdeltager)
  • Vilsbøll, Tina (Projektdeltager)
  • Knudsen, Gitte Moos (Projektdeltager)
  • Ekstrøm, Claus (Projektdeltager)
  • Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica (Projektdeltager)
  • Becker, Ulrik (Projektdeltager)
  • Vollstaedt-Klein, Sabine (Projektdeltager)
  • Enghusen-Poulsen, Henrik (Projektdeltager)
  • Jørgensen, Niklas Rye (Projektdeltager)
  • Gillum, Matthew Paul (Projektdeltager)
  • Holst, Jens Juul (Projektdeltager)
  • Volkow, Nora D. (Projektdeltager)
Vis graf over relationer
Intro:
Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is a global burden. The Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exanetide, has proven to reduce alcohol consumption in preclinical experiments and may improve clinical care for patients with AUD.
Metoder:
Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, 26 week-long clinical trial, including 127 participants with AUD receiving exanetide or placebo once weekly. A subgroup of the participants had a Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Scan (SPECT) and a Functional Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan performed at baseline and follow-up.
Resultater (forventede):
Results will be published in 2021.
Diskussion/Impact (forventet):
We are the first internationally to investigate this potential new treatment in an RCT, so the trial will bring new and important knowledge to this field, no matter the outcome.
StatusIgangværende
Periode01/08/201731/12/2021

    Forskningsområder

  • Sundhedsvidenskab - Substance-Related Disorders, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial, Neuroimaging, Pharmacology

ID: 61947459